PROJECTS ABOUT CONTACT NEWS
‘VAGABOND’ ONE MAN AND HIS DOG at the PARK THEATRE
  • ‘VAGABOND’ ONE MAN AND HIS DOG at the PARK THEATRE
    PHASE THREE OF DEVELOPMENT OF MUSIC AND THEATRE SKILLS WEEK FOR CHILDREN WITH DOWN SYNDROME The programme offered in 2017 introduced a number of advanced musical concepts to our participants such as group work on rhythm and ensemble playing. Our cohort of children with Down Syndrome has grown. A number of children reapplied to take part and we also had three new members join the group. We continue to grow as an organization and have increased the diversity of skills on offer from our professional team. In 2017 we worked with musicians from the London Symphony Orchestra and with physical theatre practitioners from Chicken Shed Theatre Company. Once again feedback indicates an appreciation and value for the programme on offer. Because of the high level of skill based knowledge and personal experience of the practitioners there is a deep sense of trust in the team from parents and carers.
  • OBJECTIVES & RESEARCH
    Our monthly sessions at Park Theatre on Sunday afternoons has given us the opportunity to develop musical and theatrical techniques over a period of time and on a regular basis. A strong cohort of young people has been part of our work over the past year. Consequently, the group had a developed sense of focus. Singing has been improving steadily. This year’s summer programme focused on pitch development and projecting with confidence as a group. We developed techniques to do with moving from one pitch to another whilst keeping in tune moving through recognisable melodic material. Starting with slow songs, which are easier to process cognitively, we experimented with introducing more complex group rhythmic chanting culminating in a fast rap poem, which the young people developed themselves. This year we also invited siblings to be part of our work. Developed ensemble playing with appropriate structural cues to listening, stopping and re-joining the composition was another target for our work. This is because successful systematic turn taking depends greatly on the short-term memory and how it focuses on key elements. These elements are not always obvious so we spent time looking at how to find repetition which could be copied and held on to in either rhythm or melody.
  • OUTCOMES
    Research shows that long term memory in people with Down Syndrome develops well through continued and repeated practice of ideas and concepts. This year’s summer programme allowed us to consolidate these ideas and to extend techniques further than in past projects. Participants developed their own narrative through picture storyboarding. Characterisation was central to story development. Participants were able to link facial expression to specific character and movement. These links developed into substantial character dialogue with strong links to musical shape and music genre. The greatest outcome was that the group were able to stage a 10-minute narrative about an old man searching for his lost dog and their resolution. It was accomplished, clear, full of variety in music and movement and delivered with confidence, care and a great sense of achievement as a company.
"Watching the children this year it was obvious how much progress they had made. They appeared so much more confident and were all thoroughly engaged in the performance they were giving. They also really enjoyed it!" << RETURN
VENUS BLAZING MUSIC AND THEATRE TRUST
(C) 2018 VENUS BLAZING MUSIC AND THEATRE TRUST PERFORMING DIFFERENCE